matadornetwork:

IT WAS PATTI SMITH who said, in a talk at Cooper Union in 2010, that “New York has closed itself off to the young and the struggling.” Smith wrote in her memoir, Just Kids, about coming to New York as a “down and out” young woman, scraping by in a cheap apartment, creating a community of artists, and even at times paying rent with artwork.

But New York City has long since priced itself out of this lifestyle, with rent in Manhattan averaging $3,822 and in Brooklyn (the “less expensive” option) $3,035 per month. This means living in Brooklyn costs, on average, over $36,000 a year — higher than the salary of your average “young creative.” Our salary increases certainly have not kept pace with the cost of living.

When I was living in Brooklyn, I was paying $800 per month to split a three-bedroom with two other girls. We were living on the border of Lefferts Garden and Crown Heights, a quickly gentrifying neighborhood which, while it wasn’t bad, wasn’t exactly the bustling downtown area people expect when they hear “New York City.” When I initially moved to Brooklyn, I was looking for work as a writer / editor, which I found, sparingly. I was working as a writing assistant making $500-$600 a month, which is not much in general and is basically pennies in New York.

I can’t imagine that I’m alone in my experiences. Early creative work, what many call the “portfolio-building years,” inherently involves a lot of low-paying and non-paying jobs. We’re often seen as “apprentices” to our trade, despite our college educations and numerous internships. I’ve found that young creatives who desire to be financially independent from their families (which — despite what you may have heard — is most of them) do one of two things: They find a “real job,” a term I use skeptically, and attempt to pursue their passion in their free time; or they find a way to commodify their passion.

I was part of the former group, taking a job as a receptionist at a fertility clinic in midtown Manhattan. I ended up having a strong love / hate relationship with this job — I loved the patients and found myself getting very involved in their care, and I found the scientific aspects of the field absolutely fascinating. I learned a lot, both about medicine and about people, in my time there. However, this was not the reason I came to New York. I’m a creative, passionate, intelligent human being, and while I was able to inject this job with a bit of those qualities, it certainly didn’t force it out of me.

The “commodification” direction is one I saw many friends take — those who were interested in writing took jobs at social media companies as SEO bloggers, and those who wanted to work in film and TV found themselves working as assistants to talent agents. These jobs, while technically in the “creative industry,” probably utilized as little of my friends’ creative skills as my receptionist job did of mine. While this is probably the objectively better option, not everyone even has this opportunity — securing these competitive positions often requires years of unpaid internships and some degree of “connection,” leaving out those of us who had to work part-time or full-time jobs during college and were not able to devote our time to volunteer positions.

Unfortunately, both of these routes are problematic. Let’s explore.

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emmyblotnick:

Either this family has no idea how green screen souvenir photos work or they know EXACTLY how they work.

(via daenerysknope)

Ten rape prevention tips:

1. Don’t put drugs in women’s drinks.

2. When you see a woman walking by herself, leave her alone.

3. If you pull over to help a woman whose car has broken down, remember not to rape her.

4. If you are in an elevator and a woman gets in, don’t rape her.

5. When you encounter a woman who is asleep, the safest course of action is to not rape her.

6. Never creep into a woman’s home through an unlocked door or window, or spring out at her from between parked cars, or rape her.

7. Remember, people go to the laundry room to do their laundry. Do not attempt to molest someone who is alone in a laundry room.

8. Use the Buddy System! If it is inconvenient for you to stop yourself from raping women, ask a trusted friend to accompany you at all times.

9. Carry a rape whistle. If you find that you are about to rape someone, blow the whistle until someone comes to stop you.

10. Don’t forget: Honesty is the best policy. When asking a woman out on a date, don’t pretend that you are interested in her as a person; tell her straight up that you expect to be raping her later. If you don’t communicate your intentions, the woman may take it as a sign that you do not plan to rape her.

Rape prevention tips

Posted by Leigh Hofheimer under Prevention

(via esmerose)

this perfectly represents how ridiculous the things women are told to prevent rape in the rape culture we live in

(via l1ttlelady)

(via thekwinnybear)

lezmebelesbian:

Sloupit.com
Join the coolest LGBT social network!

(via lick-her-hard)

royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.
royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.
royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.
royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.
royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.

royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.

(via lick-her-hard)

“You remind me of the colour blue.
Blue like the world just after sunset,
  like a hundred shades of the ocean.
Blue like the water in my lungs,
  and when it stands before green.
Blue like the veins stamped on my skin,
  like the colour of a bruised heart.
Blue as it crosses over black to give us night.
Blue like the feeling,
  the moment,
  the memory.
Blue like my favourite colour.”
— A.Y // blue. (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

kerevat:

y’all realize these are relatively basic activities right. y’all are flipping shit because this person said “i want to have sex with you, but i also want to do other normal activities besides sex”. u do realize that is a very regular occurrence right. that u can have sexual feelings for someone and also want to spend time with them. this concept seems new to y’all. 

(via thetalkingguineapig)